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Table 5 Effect of dietary magnolia bark extract on the color stability and lipid oxidation of pork

From: Effect of dietary magnolia bark extract supplementation in finishing pigs on the oxidative stability of meat

Items Dietary treatment (D) Storage or incubation time (T)1 SEM P-value
CON MBE 0 1 2 D T D × T
Raw meat color descriptors
 L* (lightness) 55.0 52.0 51.0b 54.6a 54.8a 0.450 0.004  < 0.001 0.239
 a* (redness) 5.85 5.65 7.71a 5.40b 4.14c 0.226 0.561  < 0.001 0.417
 b* (yellowness) 6.41 5.87 7.75a 6.57b 4.10c 0.251 0.174  < 0.001 0.180
 630/580 nm 1.24 1.25 1.35a 1.22b 1.16c 0.011 0.191  < 0.001 0.653
 ΔE2 5.98 6.51 - 5.44 7.05 0.291 0.389 0.002 0.174
Lipid oxidation in meat, mg MDA/kg
 Raw 0.10 0.07 0.08b 0.09b 0.10a 0.004 0.039  < 0.001 0.407
 Fe-Asc catalyzed 0.49 0.38 0.15c 0.39b 0.79a 0.041 0.049  < 0.001 0.034
 Cooked 1.09 1.00 0.20c 1.09b 1.84a 0.091 0.189  < 0.001 0.260
  1. CON Basal diet (control group), Fe-Asc Fe3+ and ascorbate oxidation catalyst, MBE Basal diet supplemented with 0.33 mg/kg of magnolia bark extract, MDA Malondialdehyde, SEM Standard error of the mean
  2. 1Times 0, 1, and 2 correspond to: 0, 3, and 6 d (raw meat); 0, 30, and 60 min (Fe-Asc catalyzed meat); 0, 2, and 4 d (cooked meat)
  3. 2Total color change between each day of storage and the day 0. Calculated as ΔE = [(ΔL*)2 + (Δa*)2 + (Δb*)2].1/2, where ΔL*, Δa* and Δb* are the differences in L*, a*, and b*, respectively, between day 0 and day 3 or 6
  4. a,b,cMeans with different superscript letter are significantly different within row